Saturday, March 17, 2018

My self-interest in Bartok's Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion



Joseph Kalicksen and Joyce Yang, pianos, and Markus Rhoten (tympani) and Steven Schick (percussion) perform Bela Bartok’s Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion at La Jolla Music Society’s Summerfest (CA).


I present it here because I am contemplating preparing a version of my own Third Sonata where the coda of the finale, which is loud, will add percussion.
The original work, composed in 1937, as was also prepared as a concerto for two pianos, percussion and orchestra.  There is a version here with the Royal Concertgeobouw Orchestra conducted by David Zinma, with score shown. 

As Wikipedia notes, the prevailing key is C. The first movement opens with a slow introduction implicitly in F# (no key signature) and plays with the tritonal relationship between F# and C (one-half octave).  There does not seem to be a lot of polyphony in the opening and the theme lines are straightforward.  But the fast toccata theme tends to become modal and gradually invites fugal treatment.  The slow movement begins with percussion alone.

The work ends quietly on C.  (Mine will end triumphantly and perhaps martially.)

I have a Turnabout (Vox) recording of the soloists' version on a LP vinyl somewhere (in storage). "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta" is on the back. 
   
The work is said to be very difficult to play.

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